TKG LEARN: The Science of Nurturing Gratitude in Schools

“For too long, we’ve taken gratitude for granted.”

TKG is thrilled to welcome

Giacomo Bono, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Psychology, California State University, Dominguez Hills

to our community for a learning opportunity focused on the scientific study of gratitude, particularly in identifying the causes and benefits of nurturing gratitude in youth and in schools

Join us for more tools on why, how and what next for deepening your gratitude practice in yourself and inspiring your children and families too

Eventbrite - The Science of Nurturing Gratitude in Schools

Giacomo Bono is an assistant professor of psychology at California State University, Dominguez Hills. He is a co-author of the book Making Grateful Kids: The Science of Building Character, associate editor of The Journal of Positive Psychology, and director of the Youth Gratitude Project, which is part of the GGSC’s Expanding the Science and Practice of Gratitude. He has been a pioneer in the scientific study of gratitude, particularly in identifying the causes and benefits of nurturing gratitude in youth and in schools.

Dr. Bono is currently developing and testing a gratitude curriculum targeting preschool/TK and grades 4 through 12 throughout the United States, with the broad goal of providing schools with resources to support students’ well-being, character, and social-emotional development. He has spoken at schools and to educators across the country about his work. Dr. Bono received his Ph.D. in applied social psychology from Claremont Graduate University.

Please click this LINK to contact TKG with questions.

Yes, “thank you” is an essential, everyday part of family dinners, trips to the store, business deals, and political negotiations. That might be why so many people have dismissed gratitude as simple, obvious, and unworthy of serious attention.

But that’s starting to change. Recently scientists have begun to chart a course of research aimed at understanding gratitude and the circumstances in which it flourishes or diminishes. They’re finding that people who practice gratitude consistently report a host of benefits:

  • Stronger immune systems and lower blood pressure;
  • Higher levels of positive emotions;
  • More joy, optimism, and happiness;
  • Acting with more generosity and compassion;
  • Feeling less lonely and isolated.

Read more @ Greater Good Science Center at the University of California, Berkeley—in collaboration with the University of California, Davis

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